We’re announcing an exciting new addition to the First Environment team: Mike Levy. Mike is a chemical and plastics industry executive and lifecycle expert with more than 40 years of diverse experience. He has overseen new recycling and recovery technology for the plastics industry; conducted health, safety, and lifecycle assessment (LCA) studies, coordinated government relations activities; and led stakeholders from government and industry organizations as part of the International Organization for Standardization’s (ISO’s) LCA standard development. Notably, he authored the executive guide for LCA titled “How to Know if and When it’s Time to Commission a Life Cycle Assessment,” which serves as the basis for the American Center for Life Cycle Assessment’s (ACLCA’s) Certified Lifecycle Executive (CLE) certification. Mike spent a significant portion of his career in the chemical and steel industries supporting long term strategic goals. His tenure at the American Chemistry Council (ACC) involved spearheading advocacy efforts for new technologies, life cycle policy activities, and education programs promoting recycling. Mike has also contributed to the development of international standards, including serving on ISO’s working groups on environmental management activities as well as the American National Standards Institute’s (ANSI’s) subcommittee on life cycle assessment. His most recent assignments include supporting corporate initiatives to address life cycle issues and develop circular economy practices. He also provides third party assessments for organizations to benchmark internal practices with industry best practices and/or standards.

 

Mike’s specific areas of expertise include the following:

Mike has a Master’s degree in civil and environmental engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and is a Certified Lifecycle Executive under the American Center for Life Cycle Assessment (ACLCA). He has also served on the Board of Directors for ACLCA since 2001 and served in full time leadership roles with the American Chemistry Council for nearly 20 years.